Industrial Wind activity in Ohio – October 2018

 

  • Darke County’s Greenville will be the site of Whirlpool’s next on-site wind development.

 

  • Huron County’s Greenwich Wind project has been renamed Crosswinds by its new owner Swift Current. The new owners are interviewed in the Norwalk press giving laughable arguments in favor of the project including saying the turbines will be “as quiet as a dishwasher”.

 

  • Seneca County continues its fight with great letters to the Editor and articles challenging the two County Commissioners who appear to be about the only ones supporting wind development. Outside money is coming into the area to smear the wind warriors and local citizens. An important community meeting will be held on Tuesday, October 16th. The notice is attached and all wind warriors are invited to attend this important meeting where State Rep. Reineke and County Commissioner Kerschner will speak. For more information go to https://www.facebook.com/senecaantiwind/ .

 

  • Hardin County is the location for a new Invenergy 175 MW wind farm. Within the wind farm, it plans to build a 150 megawatt solar farm. “It is said to be the world’s largest renewable energy project that pairs wind and solar to create a hybrid power source. It’s a rare combination now, but one that’s expected to become more common because of its potential to cut costs while providing a more consistent flow of clean energy.” The first wind turbines of the new project are scheduled to be built next year, followed by construction of the solar farm soon after. According to press reports, Invenergy says “its typical model is to own and operate its projects, but that it will consider selling projects and remaining as the operator. It had explored the possibility of selling the wind farm portion of the Ohio project to a subsidiary of American Electric Power, but that was rejected by West Virginia regulators.” Invenergy is still seeking a buyer for the wind power.

                               

  1. Hardin County’s Invenergy announcement were accompanied by recent research published in Joule and Environmental Research Letters from the Harvard John A Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences reveals that wind turbines should come with extra environmental considerations. If wind turbines are close enough, the research found, they create “wind shadows,” a pocket of air slowed by a wind turbine’s blades. Companies do attempt to space out turbines, but with the growing popularity and size of wind farms, the calculations of how each turbine affects the other grows in complexity. Taking into account the turbine interactions with the environment, researchers found far lower estimates of wind power production than those made by the Department of Energy and other papers.
  • Highland County will be the site of AEP’s proposed solar developments. Combined they represent 400MW of capacity. AEP estimates the projects would support nearly 4,000 jobs in the Appalachian region and lead to $24 million in new state tax revenue and $6.7 million in local tax revenue. Building materials will be secured from Ohio manufacturers, and military veterans will be given preference to fill construction jobs, AEP announced. It is difficult to see how AEP’s claims can be supported but maybe the weasel words used to describe the economic impact give them some “wiggle room.” AEP has committed to build 400 MW of solar and 500 MW of wind in Ohio because they claim Ohioans want their renewable energy built IN OHIO. Perhaps they have not read the results of polling in Seneca County.

 

  • Ohio hosted the Midwest Governor’s Conference recently where Amazon, AEP and PUCO Chairman Haque all pressed for more aggressive renewable energy policies. “Amazon is looking for cleaner energy sources,” he said. “At the end of the day, our priorities are sourcing reliable, cost-competitive clean energy, and we want policies that facilitate those outcomes. We want policymakers to use caution when using barriers that make it harder to develop green energy.” Nuclear energy is clean energy but these shills advocates continue to ignore its value and efficiency. It undermines their arguments.

 

  • On Lake Erie, just in time for Halloween, the U.S. Department of Energy this week ruled that the proposed wind farm project in Lake Erie will have no significant impact on the environment. Really scary. The DOE ruling comes as the Ohio Power Siting board staff continues to oppose the project, citing concerns over its impact on birds and bats. Siting board officers wrapped up a seven-day hearing on the issue earlier this week. But final written arguments are not due until the end of November. A ruling is not expected until early 2019. If the whole idea of the Icebreaker is to test a couple of turbines in the lake so that thousands can be built later, the US DOE decision is worthless.

 

  • Ashtabula County is enjoying the headaches of failed turbines where the city of Conneaut is moving closer to filing a lawsuit regarding a lightning-damaged wind turbine overlooking Lake Erie. At issue is the 400-kilowatt turbine adjacent to the city’s sewage treatment plant that was severely damaged by a lightning strike in February 2017. The blast shattered one of the turbine’s blades and heavily damaged its generator. The big machine, which towers over marinas at the city’s waterfront, was installed in 2010 by NexGen Energy of Colorado. The city entered into a 10-year contract with NexGen for a turbine to help power the sewage treatment plant. Last year, NexGen told the city it wanted to stretch the contract to 2030 to raise the money necessary to fix the turbine, officials said at the time. NexGen estimated the cost of repairs at $250,000, city administrators said. City Council members have complained the turbine was an eyesore that cast a pall on one of the city’s prime tourist areas. So it is a lose-lose for Conneaut on top of another turbine in the community that never worked right from the start. President Larry Obhof is a native of Ashtabula County but now lives in Medina. The ranking minority member of the Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee is Senator Sean O’Brien who represents Ashtabula County.
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Iberdrola, EverPower, NextEra, Apex, Swift Energy…they are all talking to your Representatives…Are You?