Lately, it has often been said that John Kasich is delusional, his campaign rhetoric concerning climate change does nothing to disprove this..

Ohio Gov. John Kasich
Ohio Gov. John Kasich

ROCKVILLE — Telling supporters that he believes in climate change and promoting positive discourse, Ohio Gov. John Kasich (R) set out Monday to differentiate himself from other Republican candidates in the presidential race.
Speaking at the Thomas Farm Community Center one day before the Maryland primary, Kasich laid out his policy proposals for the environment and health care among several other topics discussed during a town hall question-and-answer session.
“I’m the one Republican who believes there is climate change,” said Kasich to applause in the gymnasium, later adding, “I have very little double human beings have an impact.”
Kasich’s comment came in response to a question from John Talbott, an 11-year-old wearing a circular Kasich sticker who asked the second-term governor what he planned to do about the environment.
After bringing Talbott on stage for a photo with the boy and his mother, Kasich promoted developing wind turbines and solar panels as a way to promote renewable energy and economic development simultaneously.
“I’ve been an advocate for putting a wind turbine in front of every statehouse in America,” said Kasich.
Poolesville resident Kelsey McLoughlin closed out the Q and A by asking Kasich how he would improve the federal health care reform law, commonly referred to as the Affordable Care Act and Obamacare.
Kasich centered his answer on prohibiting insurance companies from denying coverage to people because of pre-existing conditions, which is part of the current law, and increasing transparency in the hospital system based on a model implemented in Ohio.
“I believe it’s easier to interpret the Dead Sea Scrolls than read a hospital bill,” said Kasich to applause and laughter. “So we need complete transparency.”
McLoughlin said Kasich’s response satisfied her inquiry.
“I thought it was good answer,” she said. “I just think he knows what he’s talking about.”
While answering a question about immigration reform posed to him by a self-identified immigrant living in Rockville, Kasich told him there are “probably ways to improve the whole system” but also told him to “count your blessings.”
Kasich also discussed the presidential race itself, decrying negative campaigning as feeding into a basic human desire for conflict instead of something more profound.
“Look, if you are a voice of positivity, people don’t want to hear that,” he said. “They’re attracted to the negative.”
However, he added, “at the end of the day,” people don’t want to live negatively.
“I’m not going to take the low road to the highest office in the land,” he said.

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